POLYMORPHISM OF NEURAMINIDASE AND NUCLEOPROTEIN ENCODING GENES OF INFLUENZA A H1N1 AND H7N9 STRAINS

  • S. V. Buryachenko INSTITUTE OF EXPERIMENTAL AND CLINICAL VETERINARY MEDICINE, KHARKIV
  • B. T. Stegniy INSTITUTE OF EXPERIMENTAL AND CLINICAL VETERINARY MEDICINE, KHARKIV
Keywords: influenza virus, neuraminidase, nucleoprotein, polymorphism, H1N1 strain, H7N9 strain

Abstract

Introduction. Nowadays, the influenza virus is the main cause of diseases for people of all ages, annually leading to death and causing significant economic damage. The virulence and pathogenicity of this virus are largely due to the presence of neuraminidase and a nucleoprotein that provide its adhesion to the host cell and replication. Genetic monitoring is an important key element of epidemiological surveillance, which includes the early detection and identification of seasonal (circulating) influenza viruses, as well as influenza viruses of new subtypes that may cause a pandemic. The precise information including molecular genetic analysis of influenza viruses, level of collective immunity, study of susceptibility to antiviral drugs, antigenic characteristics of the virus appears to be strongly required.

The aim of the study – to determine the molecular genetic polymorphism of the neuraminidase and nucleoprotein genes of the avian influenza A H1N1 and H7N9 strains and to determine its effect on the structure of coded protein domains by bioinformatics methods.

Research Methods. The nucleotide sequences of the neuraminidase and nucleoprotein genes of the influenza A H1N1 and H7N9 strains were analyzed, as well as the domains of the studied gene product were analyzed by cluster analysis and the DELTA-BLAST program.

Results and Discussion. As a result of the accomplished study, the polymorphisms and genetic distances between the alleles of the neuraminidase and nucleoprotein genes of the influenza A strains A1N1 and H7N9 alleles were calculated. The type and localization of mutations was shown. The domains of the gene products of the studied nucleotide sequences were determined. The role and effect of codons in the nucleotide sequences of the alleles of genes, which areencoding neuraminidase and nucleoprotein, on neuraminidase and nucleoprotein was shown.

Conclusions. In the result of the accomplished studies there was determined the polymorphism of the neuraminidase and nucleoprotein genes. The absence of the effect of polymorphism of the nucleotide sequences of the neuraminidase and nucleoprotein genes of influenza A H1N1 and H7N9 strains on the domain composition of the studied proteins and, thus, on the properties of the studied strains was shown.

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Published
2019-11-07
How to Cite
Buryachenko, S. V., & Stegniy, B. T. (2019). POLYMORPHISM OF NEURAMINIDASE AND NUCLEOPROTEIN ENCODING GENES OF INFLUENZA A H1N1 AND H7N9 STRAINS. Medical and Clinical Chemistry, (3), 37-43. https://doi.org/10.11603/mcch.2410-681X.2019.v.i3.10557
Section
ORIGINAL INVESTIGATIONS